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Jabbeke TR2 MVC 575 Restoration Project
Well what can we say, Glen and his team at Protek Engineering have successfully rebuilt the "Triumph Sports 20 TS" prototype!

She looks stunning and is now on display in our Moss London showroom until Tuesday 31st January 2017. So Make sure you come and visit us to see an historical part of Triumph history!

This is the story... In May 1953 Ken Richardson, development engineer and test pilot for Triumph, drove a TR2, fitted with a standard engine on the Jabbeke motorway in Belgium and reached an average speed of 124.889 mph. At that time this was a World speed record for a production car with a 2litre engine.

Ken Richardson, was hired in 1952 by Sir John Black who was in charge of the Standard Triumph company during the post war period. His main objective was to develop the "Triumph Sports 20 TS" prototype and make a ‘true sports car’… so the Triumph TR2 was born. The TR2 was not only as fast as its main rival the Austin Healey, but it was cheaper to buy and more economical to use. With an average of 32mpg with its 2 litre engine, it was quite economical even by today’s standards.”

This feat in Jabbeke really cemented the TR2 as a firm contender to sell well in Europe and the USA and make the TR marque successful to the end.

MVC 575 was used as a Standard Triumph hack/test bed and was not looked after and eventually it was sold on, used and abused like any other sportscar, time took its toll and it suffered the usual amount of rust and was dismantled with restoration in mind and sold. Unfortunately MVC 575 has been left virtually untouched since 1976, Glen the founder of Protek Engineering bought the car just a few months ago with the aim to restore it back to it’s former glory. With the help of Moss Europe as main sponsor and parts supplier the progress he has made is phenomenal as you can see by the recent photos. This is what the TR Register said about it.
See the full story and all the latest photos at the official Jabbeke TR2 Facebook page

Doubled up on carbs
Newly rebuilt H4 carbs in shiny black go in
Front on view
Note the unique apron badge
Side on view
Painting of the aluminium tonneau has been delayed
She's come a long way
Taking in some vital vitamin E
Fitting in a crowd
Keeping good company with a Triumph Stag, Lancia Fulvia Zagato & a Ford truck
The engine bay is completed
It's looking ship shape under there
The steering is in
Steering in, front wing painted, flattened but not yet polished
Ice Blue
It's like marmite, we like it, tell us what you this
Engine bay 2016
The engine is in, we just hope it runs as well as it did in 1953!
Engine bay 1953
This is a publicity photograph taken in 1953
Royal Blue
Originally and mysteriously painted an unusual Royal Blue, similar to the Moss logo!
Body Fitting Time
Just put the chassis back and lower the body, sometimes it is that easy!
Lining it up
Lining up the body with the chassis, just a smudge to the left
Rolling chassis
The chassis is finished and looks great!
The engine is in
The engine is now in the chassis and waiting for the cam timing to be carried out and cylinder head fitment
Engine building time
The engine making is in progress with 83mm liners as fitted originally
Nice Ice Blue wheel
Here the rear cross member can be seen in a little more detail
It's really coming along now
Here we see the front view of the chassis build in progress
The chassis is almost there
Building the rolling chassis doesn't take long when you get on with it
Fresh coat of Black Chassis Paint
All nicely painted up using Chassis Black paint part no. CCCB1
Just back from being blasted
The keen eyed will notice the box section rear cross member fitted on this prototype chassis
The body work is nearing completion
The attention will soon turn to the engine
The body is shaping up
It looks a million miles away from when it fist came into the workshop
Body looking good
Body looks good, you can see just how well fitting the aero dynamic aids are
In good company
Keeping good company with two other sidescreen TRs
Making the frame for the aeroscreen
The perspex screen is fitted
Making the frame for the aeroscreen
View of the frame from the cockpit
Making the frame for the aeroscreen
Copied straight from photographs of the MVC575 on the day of the Jabbeke run
The driver's aperture in the tonneau
Will have to shed a few pounds to get in there!
Back to workshop with tonneau
MVC 575 is really starting to take shape
Aluminium tonneau being made
This has to be made bespoke as these were not factory issue
MVC 575 has been moved to Francesco's workshop to have the aluminium tonneau made. This was fitted as an aerodynamic aid for the Jabbeke speed run. Glen looks really happy with it!
Same just at a different angle
This is my better side and it's quite a snug fit!
Things are taking shape
She'll look as good as new when she's finished
The resto is coming along nicely
Most of the panels have been fitted and alignment looks good
A copy of the original fitment details
A copy of the original fitment details
Fitment of rear wheel spat
These were fitted to aid aerodynamics on the Jabbeke speed run
Close up of the rear wheel spat
Same as the previous photo but just showing more of the detail
All that work has paid off
The rear wing fits well after some modification
Working on the rear wing
More work on the rear wing fitment
Serious mods to the rear wing
This demonstrates the hand built nature of these vehicles
Metal work
Close up of some metal work
Modifying the rear panel
The panel bought from Moss is modified to replicate the smaller spare wheel aperture
The boot lid goes on
The boot lid fitted ready for alignment
Left hand rear wheel arch
New rear boot liner fitted and repairs to lower edge of arch
Making good progress with the doors
Both doors fitted ready for alignment of rear body
Making good progress with the doors
Same as previous photo, slightly different angle
More work than meets the eye
Looks sound but plenty of work to the rear bulkhead needed to be done here
The doors go on
The doors have been repaired and fitted
Rust, rust and more rust
New panels needed here
Not much left of the rear
There's going to be a lot of metal work!
Front view coming on nicely
More crucial alignment work needed
Repairs continue
Front of bulkhead repair visible here
Right hand front wheel arch
A new strip has been welded on the edge for the wing attachment
Repairs carried out to A post
Two angle grinders working hard!
Front right hand side work starts
Working out the best place to start, whilst drinking tea!
More alignment
Re-assembly of front body panels to check alignment of repairs carried out
Job done!
Repairs to this area have gone well!
A tricky repair
You can see just how much repair work is needed here
The view from the engine bay
Here we can see what needs to be done to repair front wheel arch
A new front wing goes on
A new left hand front wing is fitted for initial alignment purposes
Another piece to fabricate
Work on the bulkhead is going well
A new sheet of metal has been welded in to place
An interesting bit of metal
The work on the bulkhead continues
The original body from the front
Here you can see its original colour and the unique front apron badge
The work starts on the front bulkhead
We have to work really hard to preserve as much original metal as possible
The original bonnet
Despite the appearances, under closer inspection the bonnet is quite sound and should clean up quite well
...and a bit more rust!
The front bulkhead again, time to start working. Right where should I start?
Well there's a bit of rust!
Work starts on the front bulkhead... better get my tools!
MVC 575 - Day One!
The original body arrives for its restoration, time to start working!
Official Jabbeke TR2 Parts Supplier
Moss Europe proud official parts supplier for the Jabbeke TR2 project
Moss Europe Ltd are pleased to announce their position of official partner and parts supplier to Protek Engineering for the restoration of the Jabbeke Triumph TR2, MVC 575. MVC 575 is probably the most significant Triumph in existence, following its record breaking high speed run on the 20th May 1953. Driven by Ken Richardson this streamlined TR2 recorded a speed of 124.889 mph at Jabbeke in Belgium, a world record for a 2.0 litre car.

Following its development work with Triumph, fast forward to 1976 when MVC 575 was dismantled in preparation for restoration, something that never happened. The car remained in this state until today, when MVC 575 was recently acquired by Triumph specialist Glen Hewett of Protek Engineering. Glen has set out to fulfil its restoration, no small task, fastidiously returning it to its former record breaking incarnation.

A customer of Moss for some 31 years, Glen knew there was only one specialist parts supplier for the parts needed for this prestigious project. Moss leapt at the opportunity to be part of this unique piece of automotive history, helping Glen to restore this unique Triumph to its former glory.

The full restoration will be followed by Moss through 2016 and there will be a dedicated page on the Moss Europe website coming soon

For media opportunities of this project please contact Glen Hewett, Protek Engineering glenatprotek@yahoo.co.uk or call +44 (0) 1491 832372